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Steps to Stock Investing for Value Investors

let’s make learning awesome with better collaboration, this course is part of a Series Value Investing 101. Value investing is a fundamental investment strategy that involves picking stocks that appear to be trading for less than their intrinsic or book …

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Overview

let’s make learning awesome with better collaboration, this course is part of a Series Value Investing 101. Value investing is a fundamental investment strategy that involves picking stocks that appear to be trading for less than their intrinsic or book value. The core concept behind value investing is to buy undervalued stocks and hold them for a long period, with the expectation that their prices will eventually reflect their true worth, leading to a profit. Here are some of the basics of stock markets and value investing: 1. Research and Identify Undervalued Stocks Fundamental Analysis: Key metrics to consider, include the Price-to-Earnings (P/E) ratio, Price-to-Book (P/B) ratio, Debt-to-Equity ratio, and the company’s dividend yield. A low P/E ratio, for instance, might indicate that the stock is undervalued. This could be in the form of brand reputation, proprietary technology, regulatory licenses, or high barriers to entry for competitors. 2. Evaluate the Company’s Financial Health Sustainability of Earnings: Assess whether the company’s earnings are sustainable and reliable. Consistent revenue growth and profit margins over time can be a good indicator of a stable business. 3. Determine the Intrinsic Value and Margin of Safety Intrinsic Value: Calculate the intrinsic value of the stock using valuation models such as the Dividend Discount Model (DDM). The margin of Safety: This is a principle where an investor only purchases securities when their market price is significantly below their intrinsic value. By doing so, the investor minimizes the risk of loss. Determine a “buy price” that offers a significant margin of safety, typically between 20% to 50% below the calculated intrinsic value. Additional Tips: Diversification: Even when focusing on value stocks, it’s important to diversify your portfolio across different sectors and industries to mitigate risk. Patience: Value investing requires patience. After investing in undervalued stocks, it may take time for their price to reflect their true value. Continuous Learning: Stay informed about market conditions, and industry trends, and continue to educate yourself on financial analysis and value investing principles. Value investing is not just about buying cheap stocks; it’s about buying good companies at a price that makes them a good investment. By following these steps and principles, value investors aim to build a portfolio of strong, undervalued companies with the potential for long-term growth.

Curriculum

Instructor

In these 6 years of experience, I have completed around 14+ brand representation in founder, executive, leadership, developer, and senior volunteer roles including non-profits. I completed my bachelor's in computing science from Coventry University at PSB Singapore Campus, I completed my diploma in information communication at PSB Academy, I had the opportunity to study Asian and European markets for business development and had the opportunity to diligently develop my soft skills to best and increased my cultural knowledge with in-person communication. Product engineering is one of my core specializations but I am also an expert in Agile and DevOps. These few years I have also delved into blockchain and metaverse.I had the opportunity to practice some Mandarin and Cantonese with my neighbors adding to 32 languages that I practiced at some level. I also am proficient in arts.

Package

Requirements

  • This is the second part of seven course Series Value Investing 101

Target audiences

  • Anyone who wants to learn international trade and value investing.
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